Access your files anywhere and with any device using OneDrive (webinar)

OneDrive is the free cloud based storage solution from Microsoft. It’s accessible from any device, and much easier than emailing files or using a flash drive. A lot of our devices don’t even have USB ports, and I’d always lose those things anyway.

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OneDrive comes with your Microsoft account, and you get 15GB of space. If you need more, you can purchase more – anywhere from 100GB for $1.99/month to 1 TB for $9.99 per month. In Windows 8 and later you can access OneDrive from the One Drive app tile.

OneDrive for Business comes with most Microsoft Office 365 accounts, and you get 1TB of space. It’s very similar in function to the personal OneDrive (in fact it gets downright confusing sometimes).

When you save something in OneDrive it gets stored “in the cloud” (namely servers belonging to Microsoft).  If you want to, you can install a client app that will also copy all the files locally (extremely handy).

To get started using OneDrive, just save a file to One Drive instead of your local computer. It’s as easy as selecting the OneDrive option from your list of locations. If you have many files on your local computer, you can either move or copy those to OneDrive. If you chose to make a copy for OneDrive, be sure not to get the versions mixed up. They’ll be named the same thing, so you’ll want to pay extra attention to the location in which you’re accessing them.

You can change the default location for saving files to OneDrive as well. In Settings, and PC Settings, you’ll see some options for OneDrive. Under “Save Documents to OneDrive by default”, select “On.” You can also control which folders are kept in sync as well. In settings, select the Chose Folders to select specific folders to sync and not to sync.

You can access OneDrive through Windows Explorer, where it can be configured just like any other storage location. And, you can create a folder hierarchy for file management, just like you would in your hard drive, or My Documents folders.

But is it secure??  We are always concerned about the security of our data, right? With OneDrive, your files are only accessible by you, unless you choose to share them. To keep safe from hackers, be sure to use a very strong password and add security information to your Microsoft account, such as your phone number, email address and a security question.

There are apps for Android, Apple, and Windows devices too. Just install the appropriate one on each device you wish to use OneDrive with. It’s handy to have the ability to work on file at the office, and then pick back up from your tablet at home or on the go when you want to make changes.

Are there problems with OneDrive?  Yup.  Uploading large numbers of files can corrupt your local copy, plus there are some limitation.

Interested in seeing OneDrive in action? Join us on July 9th  from 11-12 for this month’s Office Webinar, where we’ll demonstrate OneDrive and talk in more detail about the benefits and capabilities.  We’ll also be giving away a copy of Microsoft Office 365 courtesy of Microsoft.

 RSVP for the webinar by clicking here